Population Health Management Innovation Forum

The June 2, 2015 Seattle Health Innovation Meetup will focus on Population Health Management Innovation and will be held at the Cambia Grove in downtown Seattle from 5:30-8:00.

So what is Population Health Management (PHM), and how is innovation driving improvements in its practice?

PHM can be defined as managing the health outcomes of a group of individuals, where medical care is only one of many factors that affect those outcomes. Other factors include public health interventions, aspects of the social environment (income, education, employment, social support, and culture) and of the physical environment (urban design, clean air and water), genetics, and individual behavior.

At the provider level, the Care Continuum Alliance has proposed defining PHM as having three core components:

  1. Central care delivery and leadership roles of the primary care physician
  2. Critical importance of patient activation, involvement and personal responsibility
  3. Patient focus and capacity expansion of care coordination provided through wellness, disease and chronic care management programs.

The Institute for Health Technology Transformation (iHT2) outlines PHM principles and best practices as:

  • Planning for population health
  • Data collection, storage, and management
  • Population monitoring and stratification
  • Patient engagement
  • Team-based interventions
  • Outcomes measurement

Agenda:

5:30 – 6:00                Networking, food, refreshments

6:00 – 6:15                Community announcements

6:15 – 6:30                Key Note: PHM and Innovation

Speaker: Wellesley Chapman, MD, Group Health Medical Director, Innovation & Development

 6:15 – 7:30                Moderated Panel discussion and audience Q&A

Panelists:

  • Wellesley Chapman, MD, Group Health Medical Director, Innovation & Development
  • Angela Marith, Group Health Director, Population Health Management
  • Martin Levine, MD, Iora Primary Care Medical Director
  • Shawn West, MD, Premera Medical Director of Provider Engagement

Topic: How is PHM being performed and what innovations, current or prospective, are needed to improve its practice?

7:30 – 8:00          Networking

 

Event Registration

We hope you can attend and we encourage you to bring your colleagues. There is a $10 registration fee to cover our costs for food and beverages (refundable up to 1 day before the event). Please RSVP at this link if you can attend, so that we can place the catering order. We look forward to seeing you at the Cambia Grove!

Population Health Management Innovation Forum Planning Team:

  • Kathryn Brown
  • Scott Kennedy
  • Chelsea Steinborn
  • Randy Wise

 

 

Where are the hottest health innovation cities?

Angela Hong briefs the Seattle Telehealth Forum on the Location Attractiveness Survey, March 5 2015.

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We, Angela Hong and Ed Butler, are co-founders of separate early-stage digital health startups and as a project of the Seattle Health Innovation meetup group, we are conducting a “location attractiveness” study to help determine where our new companies will be based. Yes, we love Seattle, but we want to be objective about it.

This is an exciting time to be in this field. The decision as to where to locate our early stage operations is not easy. We would like to take a systematic look at the most attractive metropolitan areas in the US for establishing and growing a new digital health startup. We have just begun this process and will provide updates via this blog on our progress. Where do you think the hottest health innovation cities are?  We intend to find out.

With digital health investments reaching $4.1 billion in 2014, there is no question that the healthcare sector is ripe with opportunity. Unlike the glacial pace of change in health reimbursement and big-iron electronic health record systems, the 2014 spike in digital health investment is new and it is rapid. The top six categories, representing 44% of 2014 digital health investment are analytics/big data, healthcare consumer engagement, digital medical devices, telemedicine, personalized medicine, and population health management.

This study is being conducted from the standpoint of early stage digital health startup entrepreneurs. While we have worked within large healthcare organizations, consulting firms, and health IT vendors, we’ve learned to appreciate the difference between what is relevant for a big company and a startup. One of the first tasks we set for ourselves was to identify the criteria to use for assessing whether a city would be a good place to start a digital health venture.

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      Angela Hong, Chelsea Steinborn, Ed Butler at the Seattle Health Innovation Forum on Telehealth

The criteria we have decided to use to objectively assess different metro areas for suitability are as follows: regulatory environment, talent, financial capital, institutions and the regional culture.

Regulatory Environment: In order for entrepreneurs to want to incorporate or even set up shop in a particular location, the ease of forming the business is important. How hard and expensive is it to form a company? Are there any state or local laws that make it easier or harder to build a digital health product? Is this a location where we have to spend more of our precious startup funds on lawyers?

Talent: Startups cannot compete head to head with large companies on salaries, benefits, and, arguably, job security. It takes a certain mindset to offset the risks and low salaries of startups with the opportunities to work on something truly meaningful, and to have a chance of a windfall when the successful exit event occurs. It takes a certain population density to create a critical mass of  skilled designers, engineers, health professionals, behavioral and life science researchers, marketing, sales professionals who are ready for this kind of a ride. Diversity is also crucially important in building cohesive and productive teams.

Financial Capital: Like most other types of startups, having access to financial capital whether it’s via venture capital or the angel community is extremely important. Unlike other industries, healthcare administration is inherently a harder industry to understand due to complex regulation and legacy institutions. The accessibility of investors whose investment strategies include the health industry is a rare resource and could make a difference in startup location attractiveness. It’s not just the money- we need savvy investors with whom we can gain market insights and key connections. Being 30 minutes away from a face to face meeting reduces friction and accelerates progress and accountability.

Institutions: Most healthcare startups need to form development partnerships and early adopter agreements with   large health organizations for testing or piloting their product. Such institutions may include hospitals, payer organizations, pharmaceuticals, and life science research institutions. This is a big opportunity but also can be a pain point for many startups because of the predilections of too many institutional decision-makers to work only with “safe” name-brand corporate suppliers.

Regional Culture: Perhaps one of the more important criteria is a startup-friendly culture. Being in a location where startups thrive and can support each other can be a powerful advantage. How open and friendly is the startup culture in the metro area?  Is it cut-throat competitive? How likely is it that other companies will poach your team? Typically startup entrepreneurs need help or advice when building their company and what better way to get help or advice if your neighbor sitting next to you at the coffee shop can provide that guidance. Quality of life for our teams is critical to being able to recruit the best people. Despite the hype around startups, it is not all about late night sprints and cold pizza. Living in a beautiful area with diverse cultural resources (museums, concerts, parks) and the ability to maintain a healthy lifestyle and to build relationships all contribute to building a sustainable team and an amazing company.

We are interested in what you think.  What do you consider important when determining what city you want to live in?  What do you think are the top health innovation cities in the US?

 

 

 

 

 

What are Seattle’s Digital Health Startup Leaders Talking About?

During the summer of 2014, the Seattle Health Innovation Forum’s program planning team explored some of the most interesting new digital health companies in our area. We recruited 9 leaders from these organizations to lead the September Forum’s structured networking event. In a departure from the panels and pitches so frequently encountered at meetups we wanted a more active experience to tap the collective energy of the community. We asked CEOs and COOs from these 9 companies chose key topics for individual and small group discussions.

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The answer to the question- “what would you like to talk about?” resulted in the following topics:

  • Electronic Health Record data integration
  • The post-EHR healthcare environment
  • Predictive analytics for health risk stratification
  • Operational excellence in digital health
  • Mobile health in emerging markets
  • Personalized medicine: using genomics to guide therapies
  • Digital support for people with diabetes
  • How can Seattle healthcare startups break into the existing insurance broker and employer markets?

After hearing what each of these digital health leaders were interested in talking about we dispersed into small groups to explore each topic. Participants included investors, entrepreneurs, employees of local healthcare providers, design firms, and individual community members interested in meeting others with an interest in transforming health and health care.

Our purpose was to allow participants to meet new people, encounter new ideas, and to help build the relationships that will lead to a stronger health innovation ecosystem. In the weeks since the event I’ve heard from a number of participants who subsequently had follow-up meetings with people they met at the event. The program committee is now planning future events ranging from population health to emergency services. To join the distribution list for future events please sign up on our Meetup site.

The September Health Innovation event was sponsored by SURF Incubator, Tactile Design, and Solomon Consulting, and was made possible through the work of volunteers Brady Ryan, Miwa Monji, John Foy, Scott Kennedy, Chelsea Steinborn, Ed Butler,  Martin Suchorolski, Manin duBois, and Gareth Best.

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