AI in Healthcare: a Game Changer?

Although AI is thought to be in its infancy, it is already changing the way we think about health care. Expectations are high about AI and at the speed that it is moving it brings hope in many  areas of health care.  The Seattle Health Innovation Meetup group’s next event is Thursday September 13 at 4pm at the Cambia Grove and will focus on how AI might – or might not- change how healthcare is delivered. Please pre-register at this link.

Join these speakers from the Allen Institute Artificial Intelligence Incubator, KenSci, and CuraCloud as we explore the possibilities with those who are using this technology for patients, providers, payors, and researchers.

This is the kickoff to our 2018-19 season of events. We will give you, the audience, an opportunity to announce your projects in progress or services that could be helpful to others.

Can’t attend in person? Join our livestream at:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uolmXa5gtgY&feature=youtu.be

Speakers:

Lauren Krainski is a Partner at the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence (AI2) start-up Incubator. The AI2 incubator helps early stage start-ups, entrepreneurs, and corporate partners build large, AI-first companies that solve high-impact problems. Prior to AI2, she advised start-ups and enterprises in M&A, business development, technology commercialization, and other C-level engagements through multiple management consulting and investment banking roles.

Ankur M. Teredesai, Ph.D., is the co-founder and Chief Technology Officer of KenSci. He also holds a Professorship in Computer Science & Systems at the University of Washington. His research spans data science with its applications for societal impact in healthcare. Teredesai has significant industry experience, having held various positions at C-DAC Pune, Microsoft Research, IBM T.J. Watson Labs, and a variety of technology startups. He has published over 75 papers on machine learning, has managed large teams of data scientists and engineers, and deployed data science solutions in healthcare. His recent applied research contributions include cost and risk prediction for readmission due to chronic conditions such as congestive heart failure.

Ed Butler is Vice President, Marketing and Corporate Development, CuraCloud Corporation, a Seattle startup that provides AI-enabled medical imaging analytics and genomic testing protocols to healthcare providers and researchers. Ed has been a senior advisor to hospitals, health plans, and government agencies including IDX Systems and GE Healthcare in the US and the NHS in England.
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4-4:30: Happy (half) hour, check-in, light refreshments

4:30-4:45: Spontaneous Participation: We will have an opportunity for you to share what you are working on or ask others to join you in moving your innovation forward. Any topic, not just AI! The purpose of this informal super-quick stand-up is to connect people who have ideas to those who can help them. Any idea is welcome, however far along it is!

4:45-5:45: Panel discussion

5:45-6:00: Adjourn and networking

Hope to see you there for great conversation, snacks, and action!
Please RSVP but you can always come last minute & pay at the door too!

**Parking in the 1800 9th building garage is now only $10 after 3pm! **
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Call for Nominations: 2017 Seattle Health Innovator of the Year Awards

Dear Health Innovation Colleague,

Nominate the 3rd Annual Health Innovator of the Year for 2017 here (Google form).

Nomination should only take approx 20 minutes of your time and can be completed on a computer, tablet or phone.

This award is for your peers, your teammates, your collaborators, your staff!

The Seattle Health Innovator of the Year Awards are intended to recognize and encourage individuals who engage in the hard work of driving progress in health and health care.  We recognize that progress comes from both innovative ideas and exceptional execution by individuals. These awards are for our colleagues whose efforts we respect and whose examples we want to see more of. We want to encourage innovation in healthcare delivery, life sciences, population health, and new ways of financing health services.

Who has changed your way of thinking, over the past year?

2017 Awards will be made in each of the following categories:

Imagination: This category is to recognize individual achievement in conceiving new ways of solving problems in the health sector via new methods, ideas, products, services, or business models.

Perseverance: This category is to recognize individual achievement in demonstrating tenacity over time in the face of adversity and in transforming health innovation challenges into opportunities.

Customer-focus: This category is to recognize an individual member of an innovation team who maintains focus on the customer and builds deep, long-term relationships by better understanding, anticipating, and fulfilling stated and latent customer needs.

External collaboration:  This category is to recognize an individual who has put aside organizational boundaries and has established effective relationships with innovators in other companies.

Nominees must be individuals with a genuine connection to the Greater Seattle Area (broadly construed as Western Washington) involved in health innovation.  Nominees may be from care delivery, health and wellness, health IT, life sciences, payers/purchasers etc.

Now’s your chance!  Nominate the next Innovator of the Year here.

Nominations are due by Wednesday, November 22.  Winners will be announced at the Seattle Health Innovators Holiday Gathering on Thursday Dec 14

You are invited: register for the 2017 Health Innovation NW Holiday Party at this link.


Scott Kennedy
Health Innovation NW
Treasurer

Health Innovation NW is a Washington non-profit corporation.  Our mission is to empower individual change agents in health and life sciences to connect, to educate the community, and to directly advance health innovation.

Patient Engagement: Insights from the Open Notes Movement

examroomSharing clinician visit notes with patients can be a provocative way of promoting patient engagement.  The Seattle Health Innovators’ forum October 3rd will feature these leaders from the Open Notes movement discussing lessons from their experience implementing this innovation:

Joann Elmore, MD, MPH Professor of Medicine at the UW School of Medicine and practicing attending physician at Harborview Medical Center will provide an overview and lead the panel discussion with

• John Santa, MD, MPH, formerly with Consumer Reports, now OpenNotes Director of Dissemination

• Thomas Payne MD,  Professor of Medicine, UW, whose major professional interest is the use and evaluation of electronic health records

• Amy Fellows, MPH, Executive Director of We Can Do Better, an Oregon non-profit whose mission is bringing people together who share values of better health care for all

• Homer Chin MD, MS, former CMIO for Kaiser Permanente Northwest, currently an affiliate professor in Medical Informatics at the Oregon Health and Science University and working with EHR vendors to implement functionality that supports Open Notes.

Seattle Health Innovators is an independent non-profit community group whose mission is to empower individual change agents in health and life sciences.  We provide opportunities such as this forum to help innovators connect with each other, to educate the community on opportunities, and to directly advance health innovation via service projects. Learn more about how to get involved with our work at this event. Early-bird registration is $10 at this link.

 

Agenda

5:30-6:00 Networking, light refreshments

6:00-6:10 Community Announcements

6:10-7:00 Program

7:00-7:30 Networking

7:30  Adjourn

Insights on Primary Care Innovation

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The panel discussion at the Innovations in Primary Care Forum on May 9 provided an unusual glimpse into the future of healthcare. Jennifer Gee, a healthcare entrepreneur with a nursing background, organized the panel and moderated a fascinating discussion that held the attention of over 90 people for over an hour. It was a rare opportunity to hear directly from leaders experimenting with new healthcare delivery models in a candid conversation about their challenges and successes. Each of the panelists has been associated with multiple models of payment, support, an care delivery and is an expert in tailoring to the populations they serve.

The panel included:

Jennifer Gee: Moderator

David Kwok, Exec Dir, Hope Central

Scott Shreeve MD CEO Crossover Health

Erika Bliss MD CEO Qliance

Martin Levine MD Medical Mkt Dir, Iora Primary Care

Matthew Thompson MD, DPhil, Vice Chair Research, UW Primary Care Innovations Lab

Jenn started the discussion by asking for a brief overview of each organization, how they started and how they have pivoted to their current models. All started with the intention of transforming the primary care experience with an increased emphasis on building enduring relationships with their patients by seeing them where they are. For example, Iora clinicians see patients in the home and hospital in addition to the clinic setting. Crossover Health works with large employers, offering onsite and nearsite clinics (Apple was an early customer) and now is expanding into specialty care. Qliance emerged from he concierge movement, a response to rushed/pressured aspects of the fee for service world and uses a monthly fee model. Visits are 30-60 minutes with physicians or nurse practitioners. Hope Central, a non-profit serving the Medicaid population in South King County has had to go the other way, starting with two pediatricians and one child psych provider using a subscription model but has now adopted a more traditional fee for service model due to the challenging regulations. UW Medicine has a large delivery system that is moving from fee for service to value-based models.

Jenn then asked the panel to describe the technical innovations they’ve made since starting. The panel covered the integration of mental health into primary care. When opened up to audience Q&A the panel explored such issues as pain management, telehealth, health system consolidation, and their frustrations from current Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems.

The panel discussion and audience Q&A ran overtime, although the audience did not seem to mind. Jenn asked the panelist if they would answer her final questions for publication on the Health innovators website: We are grateful that they took the time to respond. Here are their answers:

Dr. Erika Bliss from Qliance:

How do you see your model evolving over the 5 year period?

Qliance is focused in the near-term on evolving our care model to further expand the capabilities and scope of primary care and population health management for our clients.  To do that, we are offering new models of payment that are an extension of our original monthly-fee model that enable employers to guarantee access to excellent primary care for all of their employees while only paying the full price for those who use it.  They also get population health and convenient urgent care access for everyone from a trusted healthcare partner who can tie everything together and do all the follow up needed.  We expect that this model, as it evolves in response to the needs and feedback of our clients and the market, will set the standard for primary care in the future, much as we have done to date with our pioneering work in the Direct Primary Care model.
Are there opportunities for practice models like yours to collaborate – i.e. group purchasing, shared analytics, software development, shared referral – cost/quality data, even a shared outpatient surgery center?

Most definitely – I think there is a huge opportunity now for like-minded and like-operating organizations to collaborate to deliver premium quality primary care that really makes a difference for clients.  Group purchasing, shared analytics, shared software development, and shared referral information are useful, but I think what is even more powerful is just the ability to work together to offer a broad geographical reach with a variety of practice styles so people have a choice.  The key would then be to partner with either self-insured companies or payers to offer essentially a primary care ACO where the network of high-performing primary care practices like ours reduce overall costs and increase quality by reducing unnecessary referrals, directing people to high-performing specialists (regardless of system they belong to) and eliminating the need for excess utilization of advanced care.  It’s a pretty simple idea, but with the potential for very powerful results, since most of our organizations are seeing roughly a 20% reduction in total cost of care for patients who use our services, and that’s without benefit of any special narrow networks or contracting relationships.
What are the current challenges in your business that entrepreneurs could help you address?

One way that entrepreneurs could help us develop our business would be to become purchasers of Qliance under our new Access to Active™ model and help us understand the needs of their particular sector by using our services.  This is always how we’ve gotten the best information on how to solve for the market’s needs.  To be truly honest, a lot of the technology and tools already exist to make what we do work, we just need partners who are interested in engaging and using our platform of services to help us understand where to expand next.

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Dave Kwok from Hope Central:

How do you see your model evolving over the next 5 years?

We don’t really see our model changing that much, but we do hope to expand to other neighborhoods with mixed socioeconomic demographics. We’d also like to expand into family medicine.

Are there opportunities for practice models like yours to collaborate – i.e. group purchasing, shared analytics, software development, shared referral – cost/quality data, even a shared outpatient surgery center?

What are the current challenges in your business that entrepreneurs could help you address?

Standardized technology platforms for data interchange between healthcare entities. Standardized electronic medical record. Better low-cost EMR’s (interface, reporting, API’s). More flexible insurance plans that allowed greater autonomy in the use of well-care dollars.

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Dr. Matthew Thompson from the UW Primary Care Innovations Lab:

How do you see your lab evolving over the next 5 years?

With the growing need for more efficient, more effective, and more cost effective health care, the primary care field will expand. Added to this is the growing need for ongoing care of people with multiple conditions/chronic disease as well as growing interest in wellness. I see the need for more opportunities for the PCI Lab to engage with companies and technologies that need to be tested, evaluated, implemented in the primary care space growing. Whether this is ways of integrating wearable wellness tools, new ways of providing technology that allows more to be done in single visits, or better ways to engage patients and caregivers in health. In addition, the interfaces in primary care are going to need to improve dramatically, including how data is entered, used, and analysed. Therefore I see more engagement with more companies and innovations, and PCI  Lab being established as the ‘go to’ group for innovations in primary care in the US.
Are there technologies or models you’ve seen deployed in low resource settings that can work in newer practice settings here?

Some low resource settings have been ahead in terms of use of some point of care tests, for example point of care malaria tests have transformed primary care management of fever in many countries, others have adopted handheld ultrasound scanning. Probably the biggest learning point has been the innovation in health care delivery teams, many lower resource settings use health care providers who are not doctors, but provide excellent service for their level of training – this type of model, where the doctor is important but not the sole member of the primary care health care team is needed in high resource settings (and is in fact happening), in order to make best use of all the health care team’s expertize, and not rely so much on doctors.

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Dr. Marty Levine from Iora Primary Care:

How do you see your model evolving over the 5 and 10 year period?

I think our model nationwide will move in two simultaneous directions.  One direction will emphasize convenience care for the majority population and include novel ways to meet care needs with far less office visits with doctors, but there will need to be a part of the practice with more intense care for those with chronic conditions.  The other direction will emphasize expanded chronic care services for populations like those served in Seattle presently (Medicare).

-Are there opportunities for practice models like yours to collaborate – i.e. group purchasing, shared analytics, software development, shared referral – cost/quality data, even a shared outpatient surgery center?

We do lots of collaborating now.  We work with several different innovative organizations.  This is managed through the Boston headquarters.

What are the current challenges in your business that entrepreneurs could help you address?

In Seattle, our growth is dependent upon sales of Humana medicare insurance because we have an exclusive relationship with Humana.  Some insurance sales are done with Humana-employed agents, but most are done by independent agents who sell different insurance plans.  Insurance sales are complicated and most customers do not understand the benefits and costs of plans well when they purchase them and, instead, focus on a key attribute or two (eg, total cost, or choice of doctor).  Even independent insurance agents, pressured to do all sales during the open enrollment period from ~10/15 to 12/7 often have limited understanding of the plans they are selling.  There seems to be a real opportunity for an entrepreneur to figure out how to simplify the sales experience and make the public better consumers than simply looking at total cost or choice of doctor.  Increasingly, people are purchasing insurance by phone or online.

Innovation in Primary Care

The healthcare delivery system is slowly adapting to the modern consumer. It also faces relentless pressure from those who pay the lions’ share of healthcare costs- employers, health insurance organizations, and taxpayers. This is a hard combination of customers to please. One one hand are consumers who want easy, convenient, affordable access to a deep network of excellent medical providers. On another side are the businesses and payers who want “population health”, i.e. cost containment via risk stratification, measurable outcomes, preventive health, and chronic condition management, and perhaps a narrower network of providers who help them manage these risks. The winning innovators will be the ones who can find the best ways to combine these perspectives.

The major innovations in primary care today are in new business models and in new consumer experiences, driven in part by predictive analytics. I use the term “consumer” rather than “patient” in this context because in the new primary care paradigm there is a blending of wellness programming for people who are not yet sick and the traditional sick-care services. Some new primary care organizations call their patients “members” just like insurance companies. These are dynamic times. Even our vocabulary for describing stakeholders is becoming outdated. This probably means it’s a good time to be an innovator.

On May 11, 2016 the Seattle Health Innovation Forum will convene some of the country’s leaders in this historic shift in primary care for a discussion with the community at the Cambia Grove. Some consider these new models as “disruptive innovation” because of the potential for transforming the relationships people have with their health insurance companies, their employers, and with their primary care providers. If you are in the Seattle area that evening, we hope you can join us  Pre-registration for this event is highly encouraged.

We are excited to have these leaders who are creating the next generation of Primary Care on the panel:

Innovations in Primary Care Agenda- May 11, 2016

5:30-6:00 Networking

6:00-6:10 Community Announcements

6:10-7:00 Panel on Innovations in Primary Care

7:00-7:30 Networking, individual Q&A

I hope to see you there.

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The Seattle Health Innovation Forum is a grass-roots community of people working in health startups,  healthcare institutions, academia, biotech, investors, and others interested in the transformation of health and health care. Founded in 2013, we organize forums and other projects to improve awareness of the opportunities to make a difference in health.

Meet the people behind your telehealth screen

Telehealth is a rapidly growing market opportunity that can improve the patient experience, lower costs, and improve quality of care on a global scale. The Seattle Health Innovation meetup, March 5, 2015 from 5:30pm-7:30pm, will feature a panel of experts on Telehealth implementation, including smartphone apps for patients with chronic diseases and video technology for primary care visits with medical providers. Hear from these innovators on how they work with care delivery systems to introduce new care models enabled by technology. Find out about the analytics they use to measure success and what they have found to be key issues.

Light food and beverages will be served to facilitate networking before and after the panel. This is a grassroots effort and there is a $10 registration fee. To register, please click here.

This meetup will be held at the Cambia Grove at 1800 9th Avenue, Seattle WA 98101 on the 2nd Floor.  Please arrive before 6:00pm because the doors lock. After 6:00pm you can only get in by walking down into the underground parking deck and take the elevator to the 2nd floor.

It is in the same building as Regence Blue Cross on the corner of 9th Ave and Howell Street.  For more information about this new hub for health innovation in Seattle see the Geekwire article from last October: “New ‘Cambia Grove’ health-care innovation center in Seattle will link tech startups with big players”.

The Seattle Heath Innovation Meetup is comprised of individuals interested transforming health and healthcare. It was started in 2013 by leaders from Seattle-based health startups and welcomes individuals from healthcare delivery systems, payers, research organizations, universities, investors, and the community at large.

The program will include brief presentations and a panel discussion with these health leaders:

Fareeha Siddiqui, MD, MPH is the Director of Research and Innovation, Global to Local, an innovative non-profit formed by Swedish Health Services, the Washington Global Health Alliance, HealthPoint, and Public Health Seattle & King County to serve residents in the SeaTac/Tukwilla area.  This area has more than 70 ethno-linguistic groups and twice as many people living below the federal poverty level and far higher mortality rates than the rest of King County. It offers a unique opportunity to work with populations relevant to Seattle’s global reach.

FareehaSiddiqui

Dr. Siddiqui directs the Global to Local Mobile Health Project, which focuses on the development of cost-effective remote monitoring, sustainable health promotion interventions, and improvement of healthcare delivery.  She will update us on a mobile health pilot to help people with diabetes.  She was one of 6 doctors to win Seattle Magazine’s Top Doctors: Community Service Award in 2013.

Julie Maas, MBA  is the Director of Client Integration at CarenaMD. 

Carena is a new and growing Seattle-based company that provides telemedicine solutions including a Virtual Clinic staffed with employed 24/7 “Virtualists” and an operations team that can get a system live in 90 days or less. Carena has implemented its Virtual Clinic Offering with several leading healthcare delivery systems, including UW Medicine and Franciscan Health.

JulieMaas

Julie’s team implements the technical and operational aspects of these solutions. She works directly with healthcare delivery systems to include the Virtual Clinic.  Her career spans 10+ years of life sciences and non-profit experience in a wide range of projects and roles, including development of telemedicine initiatives while at the UW Center for Commercialization.

 

ChristiMcCarren

Christi McCarren, RN, MBA is the Multicare Vice President of Retail Health and Service Lines. Multicare is a not-for-profit integrated health system with more than 10,000 employees and a comprehensive network o services throughout Pierce, South King, and Kitsap Counties.

Poore

 

Steve Poore, MD is the Medical Director of the Multicare Women’s Service Line.

Christi and Dr. Poore will be speaking to us about MultiCare’s OB CareConnect program–where OB care alternates between virtual visits with a MultiCare nurse practitioner (ARNP) and scheduled visits with the patient’s MultiCare obstetrician at his or her office. The program conducted over 400 visits in 2014, including a patient in Mozambique.

 Chelsea Steinborn, a current graduate student at the University of Washington, is facilitating the panel discussion.  Chelsea has worked as Senior Product Engineer at Medtronic, a $27 billion medical technology and services company.

ChelseaSteinborn

Chelsea will complete her Masters in Health Administration at UW in May 2015. She has focused on telehealth and innovative care delivery throughout the program and during her current internship at Virginia Mason. Chelsea will get the conversation started with the panelists and then facilitate audience questions and answers.

The meetup starts at 5:30 with networking and refreshments. After community announcements will be the panel discussion and at the end will be an opportunity to talk with other meetup participants.

To register, please click here.

Posted by Ed Butler, digital health entrepreneur and co-founder of the Seattle Health Innovation Meetup.

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To join this meetup group and get future event notices, click here: http://www.meetup.com/Seattle-Health-Innovation-Forum/

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