May 22

Insights on Primary Care Innovation

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The panel discussion at the Innovations in Primary Care Forum on May 9 provided an unusual glimpse into the future of healthcare. Jennifer Gee, a healthcare entrepreneur with a nursing background, organized the panel and moderated a fascinating discussion that held the attention of over 90 people for over an hour. It was a rare opportunity to hear directly from leaders experimenting with new healthcare delivery models in a candid conversation about their challenges and successes. Each of the panelists has been associated with multiple models of payment, support, an care delivery and is an expert in tailoring to the populations they serve.

The panel included:

Jennifer Gee: Moderator

David Kwok, Exec Dir, Hope Central

Scott Shreeve MD CEO Crossover Health

Erika Bliss MD CEO Qliance

Martin Levine MD Medical Mkt Dir, Iora Primary Care

Matthew Thompson MD, DPhil, Vice Chair Research, UW Primary Care Innovations Lab

Jenn started the discussion by asking for a brief overview of each organization, how they started and how they have pivoted to their current models. All started with the intention of transforming the primary care experience with an increased emphasis on building enduring relationships with their patients by seeing them where they are. For example, Iora clinicians see patients in the home and hospital in addition to the clinic setting. Crossover Health works with large employers, offering onsite and nearsite clinics (Apple was an early customer) and now is expanding into specialty care. Qliance emerged from he concierge movement, a response to rushed/pressured aspects of the fee for service world and uses a monthly fee model. Visits are 30-60 minutes with physicians or nurse practitioners. Hope Central, a non-profit serving the Medicaid population in South King County has had to go the other way, starting with two pediatricians and one child psych provider using a subscription model but has now adopted a more traditional fee for service model due to the challenging regulations. UW Medicine has a large delivery system that is moving from fee for service to value-based models.

Jenn then asked the panel to describe the technical innovations they’ve made since starting. The panel covered the integration of mental health into primary care. When opened up to audience Q&A the panel explored such issues as pain management, telehealth, health system consolidation, and their frustrations from current Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems.

The panel discussion and audience Q&A ran overtime, although the audience did not seem to mind. Jenn asked the panelist if they would answer her final questions for publication on the Health innovators website: We are grateful that they took the time to respond. Here are their answers:

Dr. Erika Bliss from Qliance:

How do you see your model evolving over the 5 year period?

Qliance is focused in the near-term on evolving our care model to further expand the capabilities and scope of primary care and population health management for our clients.  To do that, we are offering new models of payment that are an extension of our original monthly-fee model that enable employers to guarantee access to excellent primary care for all of their employees while only paying the full price for those who use it.  They also get population health and convenient urgent care access for everyone from a trusted healthcare partner who can tie everything together and do all the follow up needed.  We expect that this model, as it evolves in response to the needs and feedback of our clients and the market, will set the standard for primary care in the future, much as we have done to date with our pioneering work in the Direct Primary Care model.
Are there opportunities for practice models like yours to collaborate – i.e. group purchasing, shared analytics, software development, shared referral – cost/quality data, even a shared outpatient surgery center?

Most definitely – I think there is a huge opportunity now for like-minded and like-operating organizations to collaborate to deliver premium quality primary care that really makes a difference for clients.  Group purchasing, shared analytics, shared software development, and shared referral information are useful, but I think what is even more powerful is just the ability to work together to offer a broad geographical reach with a variety of practice styles so people have a choice.  The key would then be to partner with either self-insured companies or payers to offer essentially a primary care ACO where the network of high-performing primary care practices like ours reduce overall costs and increase quality by reducing unnecessary referrals, directing people to high-performing specialists (regardless of system they belong to) and eliminating the need for excess utilization of advanced care.  It’s a pretty simple idea, but with the potential for very powerful results, since most of our organizations are seeing roughly a 20% reduction in total cost of care for patients who use our services, and that’s without benefit of any special narrow networks or contracting relationships.
What are the current challenges in your business that entrepreneurs could help you address?

One way that entrepreneurs could help us develop our business would be to become purchasers of Qliance under our new Access to Active™ model and help us understand the needs of their particular sector by using our services.  This is always how we’ve gotten the best information on how to solve for the market’s needs.  To be truly honest, a lot of the technology and tools already exist to make what we do work, we just need partners who are interested in engaging and using our platform of services to help us understand where to expand next.

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Dave Kwok from Hope Central:

How do you see your model evolving over the next 5 years?

We don’t really see our model changing that much, but we do hope to expand to other neighborhoods with mixed socioeconomic demographics. We’d also like to expand into family medicine.

Are there opportunities for practice models like yours to collaborate – i.e. group purchasing, shared analytics, software development, shared referral – cost/quality data, even a shared outpatient surgery center?

What are the current challenges in your business that entrepreneurs could help you address?

Standardized technology platforms for data interchange between healthcare entities. Standardized electronic medical record. Better low-cost EMR’s (interface, reporting, API’s). More flexible insurance plans that allowed greater autonomy in the use of well-care dollars.

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Dr. Matthew Thompson from the UW Primary Care Innovations Lab:

How do you see your lab evolving over the next 5 years?

With the growing need for more efficient, more effective, and more cost effective health care, the primary care field will expand. Added to this is the growing need for ongoing care of people with multiple conditions/chronic disease as well as growing interest in wellness. I see the need for more opportunities for the PCI Lab to engage with companies and technologies that need to be tested, evaluated, implemented in the primary care space growing. Whether this is ways of integrating wearable wellness tools, new ways of providing technology that allows more to be done in single visits, or better ways to engage patients and caregivers in health. In addition, the interfaces in primary care are going to need to improve dramatically, including how data is entered, used, and analysed. Therefore I see more engagement with more companies and innovations, and PCI  Lab being established as the ‘go to’ group for innovations in primary care in the US.
Are there technologies or models you’ve seen deployed in low resource settings that can work in newer practice settings here?

Some low resource settings have been ahead in terms of use of some point of care tests, for example point of care malaria tests have transformed primary care management of fever in many countries, others have adopted handheld ultrasound scanning. Probably the biggest learning point has been the innovation in health care delivery teams, many lower resource settings use health care providers who are not doctors, but provide excellent service for their level of training – this type of model, where the doctor is important but not the sole member of the primary care health care team is needed in high resource settings (and is in fact happening), in order to make best use of all the health care team’s expertize, and not rely so much on doctors.

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Dr. Marty Levine from Iora Primary Care:

How do you see your model evolving over the 5 and 10 year period?

I think our model nationwide will move in two simultaneous directions.  One direction will emphasize convenience care for the majority population and include novel ways to meet care needs with far less office visits with doctors, but there will need to be a part of the practice with more intense care for those with chronic conditions.  The other direction will emphasize expanded chronic care services for populations like those served in Seattle presently (Medicare).

-Are there opportunities for practice models like yours to collaborate – i.e. group purchasing, shared analytics, software development, shared referral – cost/quality data, even a shared outpatient surgery center?

We do lots of collaborating now.  We work with several different innovative organizations.  This is managed through the Boston headquarters.

What are the current challenges in your business that entrepreneurs could help you address?

In Seattle, our growth is dependent upon sales of Humana medicare insurance because we have an exclusive relationship with Humana.  Some insurance sales are done with Humana-employed agents, but most are done by independent agents who sell different insurance plans.  Insurance sales are complicated and most customers do not understand the benefits and costs of plans well when they purchase them and, instead, focus on a key attribute or two (eg, total cost, or choice of doctor).  Even independent insurance agents, pressured to do all sales during the open enrollment period from ~10/15 to 12/7 often have limited understanding of the plans they are selling.  There seems to be a real opportunity for an entrepreneur to figure out how to simplify the sales experience and make the public better consumers than simply looking at total cost or choice of doctor.  Increasingly, people are purchasing insurance by phone or online.

Mar 28

Innovation in Primary Care

The healthcare delivery system is slowly adapting to the modern consumer. It also faces relentless pressure from those who pay the lions’ share of healthcare costs- employers, health insurance organizations, and taxpayers. This is a hard combination of customers to please. One one hand are consumers who want easy, convenient, affordable access to a deep network of excellent medical providers. On another side are the businesses and payers who want “population health”, i.e. cost containment via risk stratification, measurable outcomes, preventive health, and chronic condition management, and perhaps a narrower network of providers who help them manage these risks. The winning innovators will be the ones who can find the best ways to combine these perspectives.

The major innovations in primary care today are in new business models and in new consumer experiences, driven in part by predictive analytics. I use the term “consumer” rather than “patient” in this context because in the new primary care paradigm there is a blending of wellness programming for people who are not yet sick and the traditional sick-care services. Some new primary care organizations call their patients “members” just like insurance companies. These are dynamic times. Even our vocabulary for describing stakeholders is becoming outdated. This probably means it’s a good time to be an innovator.

On May 11, 2016 the Seattle Health Innovation Forum will convene some of the country’s leaders in this historic shift in primary care for a discussion with the community at the Cambia Grove. Some consider these new models as “disruptive innovation” because of the potential for transforming the relationships people have with their health insurance companies, their employers, and with their primary care providers. If you are in the Seattle area that evening, we hope you can join us  Pre-registration for this event is highly encouraged.

We are excited to have these leaders who are creating the next generation of Primary Care on the panel:

Innovations in Primary Care Agenda- May 11, 2016

5:30-6:00 Networking

6:00-6:10 Community Announcements

6:10-7:00 Panel on Innovations in Primary Care

7:00-7:30 Networking, individual Q&A

I hope to see you there.

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The Seattle Health Innovation Forum is a grass-roots community of people working in health startups,  healthcare institutions, academia, biotech, investors, and others interested in the transformation of health and health care. Founded in 2013, we organize forums and other projects to improve awareness of the opportunities to make a difference in health.

Feb 19

The future of health innovation

Health and healthcare is a $3 trillion industry in the US and is growing faster than the GDP because of an aging population and from advances in health technology that make it possible to live longer and more productive lives. It is an industry in transition. Billions are being invested in new approaches to improving health outcomes and lowering costs.  What are the catalysts for change? Who are the innovators ? Who is getting funding? Where are the exits for new health companies? What role is the consumer playing?  How do new developments in life sciences, wellness, and IT translate into business opportunities for innovators?

For our first Seattle Health Innovation Forum of 2016 on March 2nd, we’ve invited Kevin Cable to describe these major trends driving innovation in healthcare. Kevin is a co-founder and the Managing Director of Cascade Capital, a leading middle market investment bank based in the Pacific Northwest and heads their efforts in Digital Health and Healthcare Services.

The forum will be held 5:30-7:30pm on Wednesday, March 2, 2016 at the Cambia Grove. Registration is at this link.

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Dec 17

Meet the Seattle Health Innovators of the Year- 2015

The Seattle Health Innovators Forum held its Holiday Party and Awards Night December 9, 2015 at the SURF Incubator in the Wells Fargo Center, attended by about 70 participants. This event brought a festive conclusion to an eventful year in the health innovation community in Western Washington. The community of innovators here is local but the innovations we are working on are often global in scale.

The Seattle Health Innovators Forum began in May of 2013, growing from a hotbed of health startups in and around Seattle. Its leadership consists of committees of volunteers who organize an average of 6 forums a year and other projects. Our 2015 forums included topics such as telehealth, the health regulatory climate, population health, precision medicine, measuring the impact of Seattle’s health innovation economy, and the Health Innovators Awards Night. Our membership of nearly 1000 people includes healthcare professionals, entrepreneurs, investors, product developers, freelancers, and others interested in the transformation of health and health care.

The 2015 Health Innovator of the Year Awards Program

2015 is the first year for this program. We announced a “Call for Nominations” in November aimed at grass-roots innovators, individuals who are active within startups, non-profits, payers, and health institutions. We identified 4 attributes of successful innovation: Imagination, Customer-centeredness, Perseverance, and Collaboration.

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We received a strong response to the call, with over 35 nomination forms received in less than 4 weeks for a panel of high-quality nominees. We convened an team of respected health innovation professionals to review the nomination forms and select two awardees for each category.

 

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 Awardees for the Imagination Category

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The Health Innovators of the Year for the Imagination category were awarded to Jeremy Stone, MD and Swatee Surve.

Jeremy Stone MD, MBA

 078c669Dr. Jeremy Stone is a Seattle-based physician entrepreneur with deep experience in the financial sector. He is pioneering a new approach to financing healthcare improvements, such as processes to improve post-operative wound care. He has applied a financial instrument, a performance based bond, to the healthcare sector. These “Health Innovation Bonds” can be used to securitize health outcomes. He has assembled a unique team and global advisors for this innovation. Dr. Stone was in London during the Awards ceremony and was represented by Mark Gardiner to receive the award.

 

Swatee Surve, MBA

AAEAAQAAAAAAAAL_AAAAJDQyNTcxODhhLWU4NmMtNDgxZi1hMzI2LTQ2NjlmNTlkN2JjNwSwatee Surve is the Founder and CEO of Litesprite. This is an innovative approach to mental health using games to kindly teach people skills that they can use to deal with stress, depression, and anxiety. Swatee also organized the recent Healthcare track of the Seattle Startup Week, the first time such a track has been part of this annual tradition. Swatee is a frequent panelist on such topics as behavioral health and women in technology leadership, and holds several patents on the disposition of electric currents on fibers and other materials.

 

Awardees for the Customer-centered Category

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Our emphasis in the Customer-Centered category was for people who develop deep relationships with their customers so that they can understand their problems and develop predictive insights as to what their needs are. The Health Innovators of the Year for the Customer Centered category were awarded to Houda Hashad and J.W. Beard MD.

Houda Hachad, PharmD

2f4900cHouda Hachad is the Chief Science Officer at Translational Software, whose customers are clinical labs who do pharmacogenomic ((PGx) testing. One of her nominators is a customer who said this of her: “Her deep knowledge of not only the clinical aspects of PGx testing, but also the molecular underpinnings of the assays was paramount in guiding our efforts. It is very rare in our business that one can find an individual who has mastered both aspects pertaining to molecular medicine. Furthermore, her understanding of which molecular markers were on the horizon in terms of clinical utility allowed us to shape our existing menu and plan for future tests. Houda’s expertise in pharmacogenetics and pharmacology is complimented by her ability to clearly communicate the important issues pertaining to these complex fields and eloquently answer difficult questions. From a customer support perspective, she has always made herself available at critical moments, to the point where we consider her as an extended team member.”

J.W. Beard, MD

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JW Beard MD is a practicing Anesthesiologist and is the Founder and CEO of Monitor Mask Inc. As an anesthesiologist he knows first-hand about frustrations of others in his field when having to jerry-rig 20M basic oxygen face masks to provide a means for sampling the patients’ exhaled CO2 during sedation anesthesia. This vital measurement is mandated by the Standards of Care in the USA, Canada and UK but the market has simply not provided a suitable solution. He designed, tested, patented, and has successfully brought to market a new face mask for this important measurement, It is currently marketed as the CapnoVue M1 face mask.

 

Awardees for the Collaboration Category

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Our emphasis for the Collaboration category this year was inter-organizational collaboration. One of the reasons health innovation is so difficult is that it takes innovators working within established organizations to reach out across organizational boundaries to solve important health problems. The 2015 Health Innovators of the Year for the Collaboration category were awarded to Col. David McCune MD and to Steven Friend, MD PhD.

Col David McCune, MD

AAEAAQAAAAAAAAJ0AAAAJDBiMjM2OGIyLTcxYWYtNGNhMi05MjZhLTNmNDUxMzEwNmQ4YwCol. David McCune MD is a research consultant with the Western Region Medical Command (WRMC) with the US Army. He has been an effective spokesperson to increase public awareness of the Army’s clinical research program. He is focused on the quantity and quality of clinical trials which advance the health of US soldiers, spouses, dependents, and retirees. In 2015 Dr. McCune has appeared at multiple forums by the Washington Biotechnical and Biomedical Association and the Cambia Grove to inform the health innovation community of the research needs of these populations. He then followed up to help connect selected innovative Seattle area health startups with related research opportunities.

Steven Friend, MD PhD

3d9b96aSteven Friend MD PhD the founder of Sage Bionetworks, a Seattle-based non-profit organization founded in 2009, that provides the tools and environment to conduct dynamic, large-scale biomedical research transparently and collaboratively. In 2015 he led an effort  to create an open ecosystem for health data acquired via mobile apps. Working jointly with Apple and Sage, Stephen led efforts that resulted in the open-source Research Kit (Apple) and Bridge / Synapse (Sage) technology platforms, and in the launch of an initial set of 5 Research Kit apps in Parkinson Disease (Sage), Breast Cancer (Sage), Asthma (Mt Sinai School of Medicine), Diabetes (Mass General Hospital), and Cardiovascular Disease (Stanford). As part of this effort, Stephen worked to coordinate a diverse set of collaborators across a variety of organizations, often putting the interests of other organizations ahead of his own. Dr. Friend was unable to attend the Awards night due to illness and was represented by Mike Kellen PhD, from Sage Bionetworks.

Awardees for the Perseverance Category

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Innovating in the health industry is not for the impatient. It takes years to develop a solution and bring it to market. Entrepreneurs and other innovators in this sector must learn to deal with both successes and failures, technical and financial hardships, and the ups and downs from working through complex organizations. Some manage to do this with grace and as a result produce high quality output over time.The Health Innovators of the Year for the Perseverance category were awarded to Brandon Masterson and Mary Fenske.

Brandon Masterson

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Brandon Masterson is the Founder and CEO of 2Morrow Inc, a mobile health company offering behavior change programs for such conditions as smoking cessation and the creation of healthy habits. Founded in 2011, Brandon and his co-founder Jo Masterson mortgaged their home to self-fund this project for several years while they developed initial customers, won the Surgeon Generals design competition, and collaborated on the smoking cessation program with scientists at the Fred Hutchinson Institute. Brandon has the ability to take on complex problems that seem too hard, and break them into small chunks. This skill has been extremely useful during the startup phase of 2Morrow when challenges are common and resources are limited. It is easy to get discouraged. This makes Brandon an effective startup leader in the mHealth space, where the fast-moving tech industry meets the slower moving, more conservative healthcare industry. His general advice to others, and his company’s credo, is to have “big ears, thick skin and an open mind.”

Mary Fenske

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 Mary Fenske is the Founder of Posture Wings, a garment designed to place the body in good posture position with freedom of movement. This changes the biomechanics that can result in neck and shoulder pain. She designed, tested, patented this innovative garment and has persevered for 8 years to bring it to market. In 2006 she started work on this, was awarded a utility patent in 2011, She’s had lots of near-wins with licensing agreements and has continued to move forward despite these setbacks. She believes there remains a void in today’s market, even with the boom in wearable technology and continues to work towards a distribution deal through large scale retail and marketing organizations.

Screen Shot 2015-12-16 at 8.05.08 AMSpecial Recognition for “Up-and-Comers”

The Evaluation Committee for this year’s Health Innovators of the Year Awards worked through the weekend and into Tuesday evening to finalize the selection process. In the course of reviewing individual nomination forms a consensus grew around two nominees whose work in health innovation deserved an honorable mention for their fresh and creative approaches as, for lack of a better term, “Up-and-Comers”.  These individuals are Corinne Pascale Stroum and Melissa DeCapua.

Corinne Pascale Stroum

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Corinne is a Senior Program Manager at Caradigm on the Health Care Analytics Team. She is also the Founder of Oy, My Genes!, an innovative way for people to learn of disease risks discoverable through the 23andMe genetic test. When the FDA shut down 23andMe’s service to provide this information to consumers back in November 2013, Corinne developed and brought to market a website that allowed consumers with 23andMe credentials to submit them through her service so that consumers could still learn their risk factors for certain conditions relevant to Ashkenazi Jews. She is an active inventor and we expect to hear more from her in the coming years.

Melissa DeCapua, DNP, PMHNP

AAEAAQAAAAAAAAXHAAAAJDRhYmQwNTVkLWQ3ZjgtNDNmYS05OWZhLTIyNTUxNDhiNmI2YQDr. Melissa DeCapua is a board-certified psychiatric nurse practitioner. Her background includes child and adolescent psychiatry as well as psychosomatic medicine. Her nominator said of her “In February, she published a prophetic article describing seven novel ways that the Microsoft Hololens will transform healthcare from nursing education to disaster training. The article quickly caught fire on social media, pushing people to rethink the role of both patient and clinician in a future world where holographic technology more seamlessly bridges the gap to recovery. In March, she joined Seattle-based startup MedBridge as Healthcare Strategist and has since led a new product vision that combines patient data visualizations and educational interventions to improve patient outcomes. Melissa has served as Advisor for yet another fast-growing startup, Point Nurse. Melissa has done all of this and more while earning her Doctor of Nursing Practice in June and is continuing to be an active voice for healthcare reform through her Modern Nurse blog  and guest posts on high-profile platforms like Microsoft in Health“.

The Making of “Seattle Health Innovators Holiday Party and Awards Night”

The event was made possible by a team of volunteers who have been working steadily to build a more supportive health innovation community in the Seattle area for the past few years.

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 A weekend strategy session in September 2015 was held with about 10 members of the program and research committees to plan future events and set goals for 2016.

IMG_7946IMG_7947Among the ideas to emerge from this session was to launch a Health Innovation Awards night. It would be based on a call for nominations from the community. Key themes were the need to broaden our scope to include projects connecting consumers, investors, and building partnerships. The Awards Program was conceived as a way to stimulate our audience beyond the forums, and to serve as a catalyst for developing deeper connections among the community members, Volunteering to head the effort to organize a Holiday Party and Awards Night was Chelsea Steinborn.

Chelsea Steinborn

 Chelsea served as the project manager for the event and as the master of ceremonies. Chelsea Chelsea 120915is a biomedical engineer, a recent UW Masters in Health Administration graduate, and is now a project manager with the Virginia Mason Research Institute. She played a leadership role in organizing three of our Health Innovation Forums in 2015. Joining Chelsea on the planning team for the Holiday Party were Grace Agustin, Ed Butler, and Kathryn Brown.

Grace Agustin

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Grace Agustin is a Laboratory Information System manager at UW Medicine/Northwest Hospital and is active in Women in Bio and other community groups as well as the Seattle Health Innovators. She has provided support to many of our events. She was invited to join the Health Innovators program committee in 2015.

The 2015 Awards Evaluation Team

A team of experienced and impartial evaluators was formed to review the 2015 nominations. The following profiles provide a glimpse into the background of those who made the difficult evaluations leading to the 2015 awards. Each of the individuals on this team abstained from nominator and nominee roles for this year’s  these awards.

Kathryn Brown, PharmD

07cd64aKathy Brown was an early and consistent member of the Seattle Health Innovators leadership group. She is a former VP of Pharmacy at Group Health, and is currently a Director of Pharmacy and Integrated Health at Premera and is a Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Washington. She, along with Scott Kennedy organized the successful Population Health Management Forum in June 1015.

Ed Butler

Ed-at-meetup.pngEd Butler is the co-founder and CEO of Videris Health, a company focused on the needs of cancer patients. He is also is the founder of Agate Point.  Ed, along with Jessica Chao, organized the Seattle Heatlh Innovation Forum meetup group in May 2013. Ed was formerly a senior product strategy manager at GE Healthcare, product strategy director and principal engineer at IDX Systems, and a former CIO for the Virginia Medicaid Program.

Brady Ryan

AAEAAQAAAAAAAAIrAAAAJDFhMjBmZDFhLTc5NDItNGNmMS1iNmJjLTA0MGYyOGU2ZWZkMgBrady Ryan is a Commercialization Manager for the Washington Biotechnology and Biomedical Association. Formerly he was a project manager for the WINGS angel investment group that focuses on the health and life sciences sector. Brady has been active in the Seattle Health Innovators since the summer of 2013 and has helped build bridges across the life sciences and health IT communities.

Scott Kennedy, CPA, CHFP

15da9d5Scott Kennedy is a founding member of the Seattle Health Innovators and has been a consistent participant and member of the leadership team. Formerly an associate director of Finance with Group Health for 19 years, Scott now serves as Controller at the Polyclinic. Scott is also active in the Healthcare Financial Management Association. Scott and Kathy Brown organized the Seattle Health Innovators Population Health Management Forum last June.

Kristin Helps, RN

AAEAAQAAAAAAAALOAAAAJDc0NzVlNmEzLTFhMjAtNDM0ZC1hNGNiLTc2NDk5NTVhZGE2NAKristin Helps is an active post anesthesia care nurse and regularly works shifts at several of Seattle’s hospitals while she completes her MS in Clinical Informatics from the UW. There she is doing research for user adoption of a mobile post surgery wound evaluation app. She is a clinical consultant with Wellpepper, a Seattle-based digital health startup. Kristin was elected to the UW graduate school student government representing 15,000 students in 2014.

John Foy, MD, PhD

1986323John Foy is an independent senior level medical informatics consultant. His career in Medicine and Computer Science reaches back to the 1970s at NIH in the early days of electronic medical records. Dr. Foy has had an active role in the development of medical informatics over several decades especially as it pertains to electronic medical record systems. He was a director at IDX Systems (formerly PHAMIS) and continued as a senior product strategy manager upon the acquisition of IDX by GE in 2006 in such areas as critical care, clinical documentation, computerized physician order entry, and others. He was a founding member of the Seattle Health Innovation Forum in 2013 and has been a consistent participant and advisor ever since.

Others

Also assisting in the Holiday Party event logistics were Eric Jain, Jo Masterson, Brian Crouch, and other volunteers. Thanks to Seaton and Candace Gras for their flexible terms in making the SURF venue available to  this community. SURF has been a continuing supporter of this community since 2013.

More pictures from the Holiday Party and Awards Night
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Mary Fenske accepting the Health Innovator of the Year Award for Perseverance.

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Houda Hachad and JW Beard receive awards for the Customer Closeness category from Chelsea Steinborn.

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Col. David McCune MD receives the Health Innovator of the Year Award for the Collaboration category, followed by Mike Kellen, PhD, nominator and representative of Steven Friend MD PhD.

Swatee Surve accepts Health Innovator of the Year Award for Imagination.

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Brandon Masterson, explains how it’s done.

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John Foy, on behalf of the evaluation team, surprises Ed Butler with a certificate recognizing his contributions to the Seattle Health Innovation Forum.

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Pictured above, from left, are Mark Gardiner, accepting on behalf of Jeremy Stone MD, Brandon Masterson, Col David McCune MD, Mary Fenske, Swatee Surve, Houda Hachad PharmD, JW Beard MD, Mike Kellen PhD, on behalf of Steven Friend MD PhD, and Ed Butler, recognized for contributions to the growth of this forum.

Nov 14

The nomination process for the 2015 Seattle Health Innovator of the year is open! Now what?

The Seattle Health Innovator Awards are intended as an opportunity to recognize those in the community who are pushing the envelope in health innovation. It’s about asking someone you were inspired by at an event or at a meeting to coffee, to understand more about what they are working on. It’s about acknowledging the work of someone you collaborated with. Ultimately, it’s about building the health innovation community in the Puget Sound area.  Nominate here.

In order to resolve a few commonly asked questions regarding the nomination process, please refer below. 

Q: Does the nomination have to be for something done just in 2015?

Not necessarily – we all recognize innovation can take years of work.

Q: Help! I’m stuck on the nomination form!

Consider using the nomination as an opportunity to go to lunch with someone you are interested in talking to or  someone who inspired you to think a little differently.

Q: Can I nominate a co-worker?

Definitely – in fact, we encourage it! We don’t always have the opportunity to recognize the work of our teams to an outside audience.

Q: As a leader at a small startup, can I nominate anyone on my team?

Yes! Especially in the startup environment, we don’t always have the means to recognize those on our team that drive innovation. This is a great opportunity to do so.

 

Oct 16

Is the ‘Seattle Freeze” Real?

A common experience among people, especially those new to Seattle, is known as the “Seattle Freeze”. This is what it feels like. You go to a networking event and meet some incredibly interesting, friendly, and apparently receptive people. You follow-up with a successful LinkedIn connection. You feel excited that you’ve found new friends and colleagues. Yet, afterwards, when it comes to building relationships and getting to know people on a more personal level, that is proving more difficult. Would you agree?

This is the 5th in a series about Seattle’s prospects as a health innovation hub from the perspective of health startups. In prior posts we have looked at these criteria:

  • Cost of doing business – Seattle ranks in the middle.
  • Financial capital – Seattle is lowest of the comparison cities in the amount invested in healthcare; 30% of angels are specifically associated with healthcare.
  • Human capital –Highest ranked city in our study with the largest share of college grads[i]; hub for technology and sciences.
  • Health Institutions– Seattle has world-class academic and research institutions, like the comparison cities, but lags Boston, New York, and San Francisco in the amount of funding. Seattle’s healthcare delivery systems are seen as relatively complacent and risk averse when it comes to working with local health startups.
  • Regional culture- this post.

Perhaps one of the more important criteria in deciding where to locate a new venture is a startup-friendly culture. Being in a location where startups thrive and can support each other can be a powerful advantage. How open and friendly is the startup culture in the metro area?  Is it cut-throat competitive? How likely is it that other companies will poach your team? Typically startup entrepreneurs need help or advice when building their company. Quality of life for our teams is critical to being able to recruit the best people. Despite the media hype around startups, it is not all about late night sprints and cold pizza. Living in a beautiful area with diverse cultural resources (museums, concerts, parks) and the ability to maintain a healthy lifestyle and to build relationships all contribute to building a sustainable team and an amazing company.

To answer these and other questions we worked with Amy Young, of ZenCloud Consulting, to conduct a survey of the membership of the Seattle Health Innovators group. With 120 responses we have some interesting findings.

Collaborative

 

Overall, most Seattle area healthcare innovators feel the community is collaborative, open and trusting. This is an overwhelming endorsement of the quality of the health innovation community here, and is possibly a differentiator of Seattle from socially colder and more established communities. We did not survey the comparison cities so this article focuses only on Seattle.

Start-up vs Non Start-up

By “health startup” we mean new ventures building products and services in the health sector. Our sample includes all stages of startups, from self-funded/bootstrap through angel, seed, A,and B rounds. About half of the survey sample works in startups, the other half in non-startup organizations including healthcare delivery organizations, payers, consulting firms, and research/academic organizations. While the majority in both segments finds Seattle a trusting culture, we found a difference in responses based on where people worked. In Seattle, those who are working for a health industry start-up are more likely to agree Seattle is an open and trusting place to work, 73% vs 58%.

trust

Yet when it comes to meeting and getting to know people in Seattle, health innovator start-ups are feeling the “freeze”(62%), to a greater extent than those in non-start-ups (55%).

freeze

This experience is by no means universal- more than a third of the respondents disagreed that the so-called “freeze” is real. We suspect there are many variables contributing to this experience, but it seems to be felt by enough people to acknowledge as a socially experienced fact. It is helpful to understand this desire for more personal connection so that we can design experiences that facilitate building on what could become one of the region’s most competitive advantages.

Assessing our Impact and our Competitive Advantage

We will share more insights from our Startup Location Attractiveness survey at the November 4th Seattle Health Innovation Forum:Assessing our Impact and our Competitive Advantage. At this event we will also learn about findings from the new release of the WA State HealthCare Sector Economic Development Report, sponsored by the Cambia Grove, the Washington Biotech and Biomedical Association, and the WA Department of Commerce. This will lead to a town-hall discussion of what we can do to improve the competitiveness of the health innovation community in our region, Please join us on Nov 4th at 5:30pm in Seattle to help thaw the “Seattle Freeze” and to connect with others interested in our region’s health innovation community.

 

Authors

AmyYoung

 

Amy Young, President ZenCoud Consulting, moved to Seattle from Anchorage in 2014. She joined the Health Innovators Research team’s Startup Location Attractiveness Study in March 2015.

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Ed Butler, a co-founder of Videris Health, moved to Seattle in 2001. In 2013 he organized the Seattle Health Innovation Forum, a grass-roots community of people interested in transforming health and healthcare.

 

Aug 30

Health Startup Location Attractiveness Study: Institutions

This is the 4th in a series of posts comparing Seattle with other health innovation clusters. We are comparing several cities on a set of criteria of interest to healthcare startups. Katie Smolnycki is a life sciences market consultant who relocated to Seattle in early 2015 and has been a member of the Health Innovator research team. Her post below examines the institutions that can contribute to a vibrant ecosystem for health innovation companies.

Scholarship Weekend February 22, 2014 Artisan Works Photographer: Annette Dragon

By Katie Smolnycki

Continuing on our journey of exploring healthcare innovation hubs, we will examine the various healthcare institutions in  Boston, Chicago, New York City, San Francisco, and Seattle. The comparison criteria in this series include the following:

  • Cost of doing business – Seattle ranks in the middle.
  • Financial capital – Seattle is lowest of the comparison cities in the amount invested in healthcare; 30% of angels are specifically associated with healthcare.
  • Human capital –Highest ranked city in our study with the largest share of college grads[i]; hub for technology and sciences.
  • Health Institutions- this post.
  • Regional culture – to be posted in September.

To explore the institutions in each of these centers of interest, we decided to focus on hospitals, payers, NIH funding, and research institutions.

Hospitals

A competitive healthcare delivery market is favorable for innovators because these systems need to find ways to gain market share. How competitive is Seattle’s healthcare delivery market?  To explore this we looked at the American Hospital Directory, which provides statistics for non-federal, short-term, and acute care hospitals in each state with data collected from each hospital’s most recent Medicare cost report[ii]. Compared with the other health innovation hubs, Seattle has the fewest hospitals and the lowest ratio of staffed beds. San Francisco and Boston have approximately the same number of hospitals and the most staffed beds per their population, with around 300 people per one staffed bed.

 

Numhospitalsand pop

This suggests that the competitive pressures on Seattle’s hospital systems may be less intense than those cities with higher per capita beds. Concentration of ownership using the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI) is another method of assessing market competitiveness. The analysis below by David Cutler and Fiona Morton published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 2013 compares the HHI across the US for hospital referral regions.

Screen Shot 2015-08-28 at 2.19.38 PM

Seattle’s hospital referral region is moderately concentrated. This is similar to the markets in Boston, San Francisco, Chicago, and New York City. This suggests that the healthcare delivery market in Seattle is no more competitive, and is perhaps less competitive than the other hubs in our comparison set.

Payer Organizations

According to a study published by National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC), the top large group insurance companies by market share (ranked largest to smallest) are: United Health Group, Wellpoint Inc. Group, Kaiser Foundation Group, Humana Group, Aetna Group, HCSC Group, Cigna Health Group, Highmark Group, Coventry Corp. Group, and HIP Insurance Group. At least one of top three large group insurers of NY, CA and IL all are represented in the NAIC Top Health Insurance Company report; whereas a main insurer for MA (BCBS of Mass) comes in at 23 and Cambia Health Solutions (the holding company for Regence BlueShield in WA, OR, UT, ID), comes in at 25. Seattle is not the headquarters of a single large national health insurance carrier. Our two Blue carriers, Premera, and Cambia Health Solutions, serve several western states but are not national entities. Group Health Cooperative is Washington-only.

Health Insurers

Of the top 10 health insurance companies  in the US, one is is headquartered in Chicago, two are in the Bay Area, and three are within commuting distance of the New York Metro area. This suggests that Seattle’s payer community may not have had the resources to provide a launchpad for startups, at least until recently.

Cambia Health Solutions is becoming an important player in the health innovation community in Seattle. Cambia Grove opened in the spring of 2015 providing a community space to bring innovators and entrepreneurs together with stakeholders to find innovative solutions from challenges in health care. They offer a variety of programming geared to helping entrepreneurs connect with the other players in the industry. One program hosted by Cambia Grove in July was a Reverse Pitch event which Evergreen Hospital pitched their problems to innovators in the digital health community.[iii].

NIH Research Funding

Funding of research grants by the NIH is an important part to furthering research in higher education centers, hospitals, and non-profits and for-profits research institutions. In FY2015, the NIH invested nearly $30.3 billion in medical research which allows investigators to come up with new ideas that can help change the world. This was $211 million above FY2014 budget, a 0.7% increase in funding, while FY2016 funding is expected to be $31.3 billion. The NIH main themes for driving discovery and innovation in FY 2015 funding were: today’s basic science for tomorrow’s breakthroughs, precision medicine, big opportunities in big data, and nurturing talent and innovation.

NIHorgcountNIHresearch

Boston received the most NIH research funding in both FY 2014 and 2015. Boston hospitals receive the most funding from the NIH for hospital research having five out of the top six top NIH funded hospitals[iv]. Hospital funding in Boston makes up almost 50% of the NIH funding received in the area. In the other regions, hospital based NIH funding makes up to 5% of the region’s NIH funds. For medical school NIH funding, NYC area schools (12 schools) receive $1.1 billion in research with Boston and Chicago medical schools (5 and 6 schools respectively) receiving over $400 million of medical school funding. Seattle only has one medical school but receives over $300 million in funding putting the University of Washington in the top five for funding in both FY 2014 and FY 2015.

Of the NIH funding that came to Washington in 2014, the University of Washington received $437 million, followed by Fred Hutch at $222 million, representing 75% of the total. This highlights the crucial importance of the UW and the Hutch in Seattle’s health innovation ecosystem. This ratio is similar to each of the other cities, looking at the top 50 organizations receiving NIH funding.

For more information on financial capital in these regions, please see our financial capital blog post

Life Science and Biotech Institutions

Washington State is home to 567 life science companies and research organizations with a majority of those located in the Greater Seattle area. There are 274 medical device companies, 182 biopharma companies and 92 nonprofit research organizations or academic research centers[v]. These companies combined add $11.4 billion to Washington’s GDP and represent the 5th largest employment sector, with a 12% growth in jobs from 2007 – 2013.

Out of the top 15 pharma companies by 2014 revenue[vi], Seattle is only has ties to three: Sanofi (some manufacturing), Gilead (inflammation/respiratory and hematology/oncology therapeutic areas and clinical research), and Bristol Myers Squibb (Zymogenetics ). In June 2015, Bristol Myers Squibb announced the relocation of the 40 Seattle based research and development jobs to San Francisco, leaving their early manufacturing group (approximately 120 employees) in Seattle[vii]. Amgen had a presence is Seattle until this past year when they closed down their facilities to cut costs. Seattle’s biotech sector is predominately small, early stage companies and some large nonprofit research institutions. For example Juno Therapeutics, an immunotherapeutics company, went public in December 2014 with $265 million IPO and a valuation of more than $3 billion. Juno recently announced a partnership with Celgene for $1 billion to work on the development and commercialization for immunotherapies[viii]. Presage Biosciences, an oncology start-up in Seattle that works to use human efficacy data earlier in drug development, announced August 20, 2015 that they received a strategic undisclosed investment from the venture capital arm of Takeda Pharmaceutical[ix]. About half of Washington’s life science companies are medical device companies, with Philips Healthcare being the largest medical device company located in the Greater Seattle area. Despite Seattle’s lack of large biopharma and medical device companies, there is still potential for collaboration with larger companies.

Seattle’s strong technology industry can help foster growth in the digital health space, as well as innovation in medical devices.  In 2014, there was $1.1 billion in transactions across Washington State including IPOs, M&A activity, and venture equity and as of August 2015, there have been $2.5 billion in life science transactions, which is expected to reach $3 billion by the end of 2015. Transactions are approximately 38% medical technology, 31% pharmaceuticals, 23% health IT and 8% other[xi].

Boston, New York City, and San Francisco are home to many of the top biopharma and medical device companies (Johnson and Johnson, Novartis, Roche, Merck, GlaxoSmithKline, AstraZeneca, Bayer, Amgen, and Eli Lilly) and smaller startup companies as well. Chicago is home to fewer top healthcare companies than Boston, NYC, and the Bay Area but is headquarters for few larger companies, such as Abbott Laboratories (AbbVie), Baxter, Takeda (US headquarters), Walgreens, and Allscripts.

In Summary

The presence of institutions with both the resources and the business drivers to innovate are favorable to health startups. Seattle’s position relative to the comparison cities is not as strong as it could be but still offers ample opportunities for health startups:

1. The healthcare delivery system market in Seattle is similarly concentrated as other cities but the per capita staffed bed ratio suggests that hospital systems here may still lack the existential competitiveness of other cities and may not yet be ready to look outside to the startup community for innovative approaches.

2. The health insurance industry in the Northwest has not been a national launchpad for startups.The recent activities of Cambia Health Solutions is a positive development.

3. NIH funding in Seattle lags Boston, New York, and San Francisco but is still respectable. This provides a critical funding stream and keeps Seattle in the running as an attractive location for health startups. This is mostly due to the influence of the UW and Fred Hutch in attracting federal research funds and spinning off new companies.

4. Seattle has a vibrant community of life sciences organizations that are not as  large as those found in Boston and other life sciences hubs. The economic impact of this sector has been strong, with 12% job growth 2007-2013, as the 5th largest employment sector in the state.

[i] http://www.citylab.com/work/2013/01/does-human-capital-tend-cluster-center-cities-or-suburbs/3245/

[ii] https://www.ahd.com/state_statistics.html

[iii] http://elevarco.com/2015/08/evergreenhealth-cambia-grove-and-elevar-seek-digital-health-startups-to-improve-the-patient-and-provider-experience/

[iv] http://www.masslifesciences.com/why-ma/research/

[v] http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/washbio.site-ym.com/resource/resmgr/WBBA_IndustryTrends-1Page.pdf

[vi] http://www.fiercepharma.com/special-reports/top-15-pharma-companies-2014-revenue

[vii] http://www.geekwire.com/2015/bristol-myers-squibb-relocating-40-seattle-scientists-to-san-francisco-five-years-after-acquiring-zymogenetics/

[viii] http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-06-29/celgene-buys-stake-in-juno-in-1-billion-partnership-deal

[ix] http://presagebio.com/releases/Presage_PR_08202015.pdf

[x] http://www.biospace.com/News/seattle-biotech-nanostrings-revenue-up-20-as/386850

[xi] http://www.bizjournals.com/seattle/blog/health-care-inc/2015/08/washington-state-life-sciences-deals-led-by-juno.html?ana=twt

Aug 11

Seattle as a Healthcare Hub: Finding Talent

According to a study from the University of Washington, “Humans get smart by being around other smart people.” The study describes this trait as the way in which Seattle is currently transforming itself into a hub of human capital, as educated individuals with talent and creativity have been moving into the city for decades. This influx of knowledgeable and skilled individuals is an absolute plus for those interested in achieving innovation and change.

This is the third in a series of blog posts in which we are contrasting Seattle’s health startup environment with other leading hubs for health and life science innovation. Each of these posts focuses on a different location evaluation criterion, including the cost of doing business, the availability of investment, and  this week it’s about the availability of talent-  the human capital of startups.

The purpose of this series is personal, rather than to create yet one more “top 5” lists. We’re both working on our digital health startups and we are open to locating anywhere in the world that helps us be more successful. While we’re fond of Seattle, our mission is not to promote Seattle. It’s about succeeding in our startups, both of which have co-founders in other major health hubs.

IMG_7319 2(Pictured: Sean Bell of Arrivale discusses scientific wellness at the Seattle Health Innovation Forum on Precision Medicine, July 2015)

Innovation Happens at the Edges

Just as sparks fly between positive and negatively charged bodies, the juxtaposition of disciplines and industries can produce new insights leading to innovative breakthroughs. The Pacific Northwest in the past 20 years has attracted talent to fuel its need for highly skilled, creative people in these sectors:

  • Life sciences
  • Software development
  • eCommerce and Cloud services
  • Aerospace

Seattle is listed  as one of the top 10 life sciences clusters in the United States, according to the 2014 survey by JLL’s Life Sciences group. According to the Washington Biotechnical and Biomedical Association, 567 life science companies and over 34,000 individuals are directly employed in this segment averaging over $83,000 in salaries (compared with an average $53k in WA).

While that is good news for Seattle, it is worth observing that Boston is #1,  San Francisco is #2, and San Diego is #3, Raleigh/Durahm 4th, and the New York/NewJersey megalopolis 5th in that same list of life science clusters. Seattle ranks only 10th on that list. The industrial diversity in Seattle is competitive with these cities, but is not unique. Seattle has unique qualities that we’ll get to in subsequent posts, and is competitive, if not leading, in accessibility of world-class human talent.

Washington state has 90,000 software developers, which are some of the highest paid jobs in the state. Tech employees have a median salary between $100,000 and $140,000 per year, according to the a recent study by the Washington Technology Industry Association.

The Seattle tech knowledge-base has been growing via significant hiring by such new economy leaders as Amazon, Facebook, Google, Tableau, Expedia, Juno Therapeutics, and others. The major players in the rapidly growing cloud computing industry are concentrated in the Pacific Northwest, with Microsoft, Google, and Amazon’s cloud technologists all located in the metro Seattle area, and with low-cost, clean hydro-electric powered data centers in Eastern Washington. Greg Gottesman, of the Madrona Venture Group was quoted in Geekwire as saying “the Pacific Northwest has had an incredible influx of engineers, some to startups and many to bolster the engineering offices of companies that aren’t headquartered here like Google and Facebook,” said Gottesman. “If you believe as I do that top technical talent is the lifeblood of successful startups, I think the trends are very favorable for our region over the next decade.”

The Aerospace industry is a long-time anchor of Pacific Northwest industry. While Boeing has moved its headquarters to Chicago and many of its manufacturing and engineering functions to other parts of the world, others are stepping in, such as Esterline Technologies, Crane Aerospace, Aerojet, Electropact, and others. While the relevance of these industries to health innovation may at first appear remote, the presence of such advanced high-tech companies creates a population of well-insured and educated patients. Healthcare delivery systems in most metro areas must compete to improve quality and reduce costs for self-insured employers.In Seattle this results in fierce competition among delivery systems to maintain an edge. Greg Marchand, Director of Benefits Policy and Strategy for the Boeing Company at a Health Collaborative forum in December 2014. He described their efforts to better manage their $2 billion in annual employee healthcare expenses. The Boeing Accountable Care Organization has created a more competitive model and Boeing has also invested in their own health analytics group to measure improvements.

Health Meetups Compared

We’re seeing this cross-industry innovation interest in the membership growth of the Seattle Health Innovation Meetup, founded two years ago.  The group has experienced net growth of 63% in the last 7 months, currently around 850 members, with event attendance between 80-100.

Screen Shot 2015-08-11 at 11.07.43 AM

The membership growth in the Seattle Health Innovators can be a useful proxy for the engagement of the community supporting health innovation. While larger than the Boston Health 2.0 chapter, we are still smaller than similar groups in other cities in absolute numbers.  The San Francisco-based Health Technology Forum is 2 years older and has 3,439 members, of whom around 150 attend the meetings. The New York City Health 2.0 chapter, founded 7 years ago, has 4,542 members (events draw 73-150).

High in Education Capital

Seattle is also one of the top ten US cities with the largest population of college graduates, making it a destination for educated individuals who are more likely to produce new ideas in every field (CityLab). The city also has a considerable community of individuals going to school in health-related fields The  University of Washington’s Seattle campus had an enrollment of 44,158 in 2014, with 240 new students admitted to its reputable medical program every year, and “the Department of Medicine is comprised of 14 Divisions” for hundreds of students working to receive degrees in the field (University of Washington). We also have Seattle University (7,560 students), Seattle Pacific University (3,891) and a variety of community colleges offering health and technology related training.

City-wide Analysis: Seattle and Health Care

Seattle may not yet be at the level of some the other major cities that have become innovation centers for health and medical care, but it is on its way. Advisors and educated individuals inhabit the city while a large population of young, health-conscious people also flock there. It is beneficial to remember Seattle’s potential and for those who are hoping to create and invent new possibilities in the field to consider making Seattle their creative nucleus. More than anything else, the city’s human capital is especially well suited for this type of work, making it a perfect place for innovators, dreamers, and hard workers to create the next big change in healthcare.

IMG_6982

Density matters.  Seattle is compressed between Lake Washington on the east and Puget Sound, making it a walkable downtown, similar in that respect to San Francisco and New York City, only smaller. The high technology companies east-of-Lake-Washington in the communities of Bellevue, Kirkland and Redmond are within a 30-40 minute bus ride from downtown Seattle of the U District.

Considering Making a Move to a Health Innovation Capital?

Seattle’s health startup community has access to world-class human talent in one of the major hubs of technology and health innovation. If you are looking for a way to share new and big ideas with other like-minded individuals, consider the Emerald City. Our next blog posts in this series will compare the health institutions in the area with other cities, and the culture of innovation.

Authors:

Angela Hong, CEO Healthy Beeps

Angela Hong

Ed Butler, CEO, Videris Health

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Jul 24

Seattle Health Innovation Forum on Precision Medicine July 29th

In the July 29th Health Innovation Forum we’ll hear from leaders from two Seattle-based firms on the forefront of this revolutionary approach to health.  Precision Medicine is defined by the NIH as “ an emerging approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person. “ 

This is the summer networking event of the Seattle Health Innovators, an independent grass-roots community of people interested in transforming health and health care. RSVP here. There is a $10 registration fee to cover the catering of hors d’oeuvres and beverages.

Our speakers will describe their work, followed by an interactive dialog with the audience. We will talk about opportunities at the intersection of life sciences with educated and engaged citizens/patients.

Sean Bell, MBA, is the Chief Business Officer for Arivale, a startup founded by Lee Hood. As reported in Geekwire, Arivale describes itself as “a revolutionary new wellness company combining cutting-edge science, an intimate and unprecedented view of your body, and personalized coaching to help you achieve your unique wellness potential”.

Sean managed the day to day operations of the 100K Project of the Institute of Systems Biology until it became Arivale. It creates an “N-of-1” health data cloud based on an individual’s genomics, metabolomics, microbiome, and “quantified self” metrics. Prior to working with ISB Sean held a senior leadership role in Alere Wellbeing.

Michael Kellen, PhD., leads the technology development team for Sage Bionetworks, a non-profit biomedical research organization founded by Stephen Friend.  Sage Bionetworks is dedicated to developing data-driven methods to improve human health, and has a strong focus on building open systems and networks of individuals that can collaboratively solve complex scientific problems.  They have recently established a program to gather real-time medical information from citizen/patient communities through mobile devices, participating as a launch partner for Research Kit with Apple and other medical centers.

Michael completed a PhD at the UW in 2002 with a focus on computational biology and helped start local bioinformatics company Teranode before joining Sage Bionetworks. His work centers on how technological advances in technology areas such as smartphones and cloud computing can accelerate biomedical research.

Agenda

5:30-6:00 Networking, food and beverages

6:00-6:15 Community Announcements

6:15-7:00 Precision Medicine Speakers and Discussion

7:00-7:30 Networking, individual Q&A with speakers

 

The venue is at the Cambia Grove, 1800 9th Avenue, 2nd floor, Seattle, WA 98101.

To RSVP please click here: http://www.meetup.com/Seattle-Health-Innovation-Forum/events/223664522/

 

Jun 29

Where are the best cities for health startups to get financial capital?

 

 

Angela Hong

 

By Angela Hong, June 29, 2015

This post is part of a series that compares Seattle with other cites using these criteria for what it takes for an area to become a health innovation hub:

  • Cost of doing business / regulatory complexity
  • Talent availability
  • Financial capital
  • Health institutions one might work with
  • Regional culture / quality of life

Our last post compared the relative cost of doing business in Seattle. Seattle falls squarely in the middle compared to the other cities in our sample (Boston, Chicago, NYC, and SF). In this article, we’ll explore how Seattle fares in financial prowess.

In 2012, Seattle was ranked 9th in the top 10 best U.S. cities for business by ThinkAdvisor and also named the “29th most competitive city in the world.” In 2014, it jumped to 4th on Forbes‘ list of “best places to launch a startup.” While many factors make a city favorable to entrepreneurs looking to invest in new health products, financial capital is one of the most important. Its presence in Seattle is helping to make the city an up-and-coming hub for innovation, especially in the field of health.

Who’s Investing?

Compared to other large cities, Seattle is becoming more well-known for its ability to draw ingenuity through financial capital. Exhibit A below shows that the number of angel investors in the city rival those of other major metropolitan areas: such as New York City, San Francisco, Chicago, and Boston. While New York and San Francisco currently outnumber most cities in local angels—at 1221 and 2163, respectively—Boston’s 397 seems reachable for Seattle. The Emerald City, as shown in this Angel List report, has 277 individuals who provide start-up capital for businesses, and this number is even greater than that of Chicago, which currently stands at 271.

This places Seattle in the running with major healthcare innovation hubs. And if the city’s number of investors begins to increase, a rise in healthcare-specific investors at the current rate would put Seattle level with well-established cities in terms of financial capital available for healthcare-related businesses.

Angel compare

Exhibit A: Angel Investor Comparison

Follow the Money

According to this Angel List data, eighty million dollars were invested by Seattle’s angels investing in health startups.This is lower than the other cities in our survey. The highest amount is spent in San Francisco at $1.04 billion and the second lowest is Chicago at $150 million.

Seattle: Financial Capital Overview

While Seattle has many fine qualities which make it an ideal business start-up city, it may not be thought of as a top health innovation hub in the way New York City, San Francisco, Boston, and Chicago are currently perceived. However, with rising numbers of angel investors interested in funding health-related businesses and the amount of financial capital for healthcare innovations already in motion, the city and its resources should be considered by those looking to make a difference in the medical field via creating new products, ideas, and business.

 

About the author

Angela Hong is a co-founder and CEO of Healthy Beeps She moved to Seattle from Boston in 2014 and is leading the Health Startup Location Attractiveness project.

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